Sunday, April 24, 2011

Makeup and Hair Tips


Actress Salma Hayek has come a long way from the small town of Coatszacoalcos, located in the state of Veracruz, Mexico. Born on Sept. 2, 1966, she is part Spanish and part Lebanese—a pedigree that undeniably accounts for her exotic beauty.

Salma launched her acting career in her early 20s, appearing in a number of Mexican tele-novelas (soap operas). She first found an international audience when she landed a small part in Mi Vida Loca (“My Crazy Life”), a 1993 film about Latina girls growing up in a poor Los Angeles neighborhood. She eventually garnered supporting roles in Desperado, Road Racers, Four Rooms and Fair Game, before achieving superstardom with When Fools Rush In, Traffic, Once Upon a Time in Mexico and her Oscar-nominated tour de force, Frida.

The length of Salma’s hair allows her great versatility: long (either sleekly straight, curled, or adorned with accent braids); shoulder length, with sexy flipped ends, embellished with hair jewelry or the occasional flower; pulled back into a graceful topknot or chignon, defined by a center part; or slicked back to accentuate the symmetry of her refined bone structure.
Salma’s hair is one of the most luxurious shades of brown. Colorist Jaime Abraham of Looks Salon in Naperville, Illinois, believes such deep, natural tones are one of the hottest trends this year. “I don't know if you've seen Salma Hayek’s hair recently, but a lot of the stars have really rich, dark hair,” she told The Chicago Tribune in July, noting that stars like Salma tend to set the stage for the rest of us.

Perhaps Salma is the best judge of her own style, which may account for her fascination with the iconoclastic Frida Kahlo. The 1920s were sexy “because they were a time of experimentation and self-expression,” she told In Style magazine in September 2003. “All of a sudden, women were independent and speaking up. They were flying airplanes, directing and painting. The ’20s were also a time of sexual freedom; even the makeup and hairstyles had romance and glamour. Clothing was chic, and makeup highlighted the eyes, which are the windows to your soul."

Many beauty experts have dissected Salma’s look in their upscale books. In Latina Beauty, BelĂ©n Aranda-Alvarado, a former beauty editor for Latina magazine, describes Salma’s makeup as a palette of shimmery neutrals:

  • For the face, begin with foundation and concealer to even skin tones and cover any blemishes. Avoid using powder (unless your skin is oily). Mix dark contour powder with blush, and apply to cheeks.

  • Eyeshadow should be a neutral pink or pearl, with a slight frost, applied from the eyelid to the top of the brow bone. Blend in a touch of silver shadow for contour, as well as a shimmery white shadow on the outer two-thirds of the brow bone to play up the eyes.

  • Curl lashes and apply mascara.

  • Brows should be tamed, but retain their thick, natural arch.

  • Lips are also neutral—a brownish-pink, without the severe penciled-in outline to which so many women seem addicted. Add a clear gloss for shine.

In The Mane Thing, celebrity hairstylist Kevin Mancuso teaches readers how Salma’s thick and curly hair can be sensually straightened. The cut is one length, with layers around the face. After shampooing, conditioning and towel-drying hair, you’ll find that the process couldn’t be easier:

  • Apply straightening gel to damp hair, and comb it through. Detangle, as necessary.
  • Section the hair, pinning it atop the head. Blow-dry from the bottom layers inward, gently pulling on each section with your brush to straighten it.
  • Repeat for all sections of hair, saving the top for last.
  • After hair is dry, apply a small amount of silicone, and brush hair to enhance shine.
  • Use a flat iron for finishing.

With the Frida prosthetic unibrow long gone, Salma is now the face of Avon, appearing in the global beauty company’s new My Lip Miracle television commercial. She will be featured in numerous print and TV ads for cosmetics and fragrances, also partnering with the nonprofit Avon Foundation to publicize its domestic violence initiative.
“Salma's personal story and values are a perfect fit for us, and we have a shared commitment to the empowerment and well-being of women,” says Avon Chair and CEO Andrea Jung.

“I’m very optimistic that in joining forces with Avon, we can truly make a difference to the important cause of domestic violence and bring hope and empowerment to women around the world,” Salma adds.

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